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. >> well-done. good job. >> coming up on c-span2, a look at egypt's parliamentary elections next month. that is followed by comcast ceo brian roberts on the future of cable and where technology is headed. then a look at the 10th anniversary of the iraq war with a discussion of how it has changed the middle east. and with congress on its spring recess this week we'll take the opportunity to show you booktv in prime time every week night. tonight, three books on u.s. innovation. it begins at 8:30 eastern. >> let's got straight to a personal topic. it has been, you've been on the commission since 2006. the chairman has been on i believe since 2009. his term is up. yours will be up next year. should we expect to see some turnover at the commission? >> you always expect to see turnover at the commission because we all have staggered terms. >> right. >> the past six years flown by very quickly and, we shall see. stay tuned. i get asked this question every couple of years. and when you've been there almost seven years you get asked at inflection points about this. i openly thinking about it b
has been working on a way to rally the faithful and plot a new strategy for the midterm election in 2014 and presidential contest in 2016. one of the silver linings which happened along the way is getting reelected as party chairman. to create a playbook for his silver lining, he also commissioned an inward look to see why the party failed to win and how to get a different result next time. so what did he come up with? he said yesterday on cps' "face the nation" that the rnc will spend $10 million on staff to communicate its principles across the u.s., shorten the time spent on election primaries, move up the convention date and limit the number of primary debates. findings on the so-called occupancy are what brings him here this morning. he's also celebrating his 42nd birthday here on our stage. >> 43. >> 41, i'm sorry. [laughter] young enough that it won't make a difference. to celebrate his 41st birthday, please help me give a warm welcome to republican national committee chairman reince priebus. [applause] >> all right, thank you. prison -- [applause] well, i appreciate that
that the american people went to the polls of in support of in the election just a few months ago. it takes the kind of truly balanced approach that families across our country strongly support, and i believe it is a strong and responsible vision for building a foundation for growth and restoring the promise of american opportunity. now, i spoke at length last night about our budget. it's built on three principles. number one, we have got to protect our fragile economic recovery, create jobs and invest in our long-term growth. this is something that every family in america is asking us to focus on. number two, we need to tackle our deficit and debt fairly and responsibly. as democrats, we understand that is a responsibility that we bear today and we do it in this budget. and number three, we need to keep the promises we made as a nation to our seniors and our families and our communities. many who have struggled so much over the last few years and are counting on us to be there for them again now. mr. president, we'll be hearing a lot more about all these principles today and we're going to discuss
different direction than the national democrats want to and winning elections with that approach. so there's a lot to be learned both by the failure of the romney campaign and the senate races and the successes the republicans have had at the state level. >> host: and we're taking your calls in this segment with grover norquist with americans for tax reform. the phone lines are open. democrats, 202-585-3880. republicans, 202-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. grover norquist known as an expert on some of these budget issues. you bring up the senate budget that we saw from budget chairwoman patty murray last week with. talk about that and how you think it compares to paul ryan's budget. >> guest: there are two major differences. they certainly go in different directions. the paul ryan budget balances in ten years and does not raise taxes. patty murray's budget never balances and raises taxes $1.5 trillion over the next decade. so what the democrats and patty murray are saying in addition to the $600 billion tax increase that obama won in january and the trillion dollars of obamacare tax
election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run against me, not one second, by the way. [applause] but they're in the business of trying to undermine and weaken us, and i didn't back up on any principle. we debated the issue of life, and i said my opponent, my leftist opponent cannot answer two questions on life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. and at what moment does life begin? the instant of conception. and the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those questions. they know they lose the debate. i stood on life, and i stood on marriage -- [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people that have been backing away from these challenges don't seem to realize that i'm still standing. [applause] now, why is that? i didn't run a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy an
for congress to wake up to our responsibility as elected officials and as stewards of this planet. the alarm has been sounded by the scientific community which overwhelmingly, overwhelmingly warns about the effects of our carbon dioxide emissions on our atmosphere and oceans. our defense and intelligence communities warn of the threats posed by climate change to national security and international stability. economists recognize the distortion of energy markets that overlook the true cost of carbon pollution, and government accountants now list climate change as a threat to our fiscal stability. now, today, as we enter the passover and easter season and as catholics the world over celebrate the selection of a new pope, we turn to voices of faith. they, too, call upon us. they call upon us to heed the moral imperatives of protecting creation and seeking justice for all people. they call upon us to reflect on our faith, on our relationship to our world and each other and on our responsibility to future generations. and they call upon us as president obama reminded us in his inaugural address t
policy and an election in which voters spoke loudly and clearly, the american people want their elected representatives to stop arguing and reach some solutions. mr. president, i come to the floor today to discuss a budget plan that meets this challenge. the senate budget that passed through the budget committee last week with the strong support of all ten democrats and two independents. it is a responsible and balanced plan that puts the economy first and tackles our deficit and debt responsibly and credibly, and i am hopeful that after it passes the senate, the house of representatives stands ready to compromise as well and we can come together around a balanced and bipartisan deal that the american people expect and deserve. mr. president, the budget debate is too often discussed in terms of abstract numbers and political winners and losers, but the truth is that budgets are about far more than that. they are about our values and our priorities. they are about our visions for how government should be serving its citizens today and for generations to come. and most of all, they are ab
. and this is when we had a much more successful election, the parliamentarian elections and so forth. there was an opportunity, i believe, at that stage to consolidate some gains and to move toward a sustainable political outcome. and we know that some of those efforts failed or weren't sufficient to consolidate those gains. and so the future of iraq is, obviously, very much in question beyond this point, but i think it's very important to understand that these conflicts evolve over time, and we're fighting enemies there who have a say in the future course of events, and we need to talk more about those enemies. what are they trying to achieve, what are their goals, what are their strategies? because then we could inform the public about what the stakes are. but instead we talk about only us, and we talk about only our number of troops and what we did and as if everything we did led to the outcome without any interaction with those against whom we're fighting. >> let's open the conversation now, and -- [laughter] i think what we'll do given the number of hands i see is we'll take two
as to how we're going to spend money and at least present to the american people who elected us to come here and represent them, at least tell them, give them the transparency of how we are spending their money. finally after 1,420 days, after four years we have a budget before us. and while i'm pleased we have a case and i'm pleased we're here debate debating it, it's disappointing when we learn what that budget offers. you would think after four years and the four years that we have been through and the 23 million people unemployed or underemployed and the rate of growth of this economy, half of what it normally is, you would think that that budget being presented to us here would take some steps toward addressing our spending issues and would not incorporate $1 trillion or more of increased taxes which will just simply go to more spending. how could we possibly support a budget with a $16.7 trillion debt that plunges us further into debt, with a staggering increase in debt, and also spending that doesn't reduce spending but simply reduces the rate of growth of spending, which is a step b
, for example, we teach a newly elected members of congress program every two years. this year i taught, i think we had 56 newly elected members, and in addition to teaching them budgeting and event during the day, i mean, i had a whole group of them that met with him privately just to go through some of these issues. a lot of interest in reforming the veterans disability system. a lot of interest in what's going on in the tricare and pentagon health care system. a lot of interest in trying to get information. i have a lot of staffers on the hill who are contacting me and my students all the time trying to get information. i have not seen that translate into somebody who would fall on their sword, so speak, to try and lead a complete transformation in how we think about war costs, and you know i don't see anyone, unicode is sort of about to take that charge. i think a number of those who have looked at it carefully, for example, bob who was the head of the house veterans committee, who is very much embraced my reform ideas for the disability system. he left congress met andy is mayor of san dieg
be a floor filled with senators debating the issues and voting on them. i think that's what we were elected to tkofplt -- do. and i think the people on c-span would like to see activity on the senate floor. madam president, i yield the floor and suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: aauto mr. coats: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from indiana. mr. coats: madam president, i ask unanimous consent that the call of the quorum be vacated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: madam president, i was puzzled earlier today when the majority leader came to the floor to propose a unanimous consent request that we move forward with this continuing resolution. he's right, we should move forward with this. but i was puzzled by the fact that he said we've been standing around here now looking at each other and -- and we're not doing anything. well, we haven't done anything for the past 36 hours while we're trying to figure out who ought -- who has the right to offer an amendment and what -- wheth
, that was a critical part of the 2012 election process and that i frankly think the american people have broadly embraced. we have put forward a budget that meets the values agenda that our democratic budget committee stands behind. to invest in critical areas of our economy, whether infrastructure, education or r&d, to help lift the private sector and help grow jobs again, to keep our most vital commitments to seniors and to veterans and to those most at risk in our society while still making responsible, steady progress towards reducing our crippling deficit and debt. we get the deficit down to less than 3% of g.d.p. at the end of the ten-year period, we stabilize our publicly held debt at 70% of g.d.p. these are the targets broadly agreed on by every major bipartisan group that has looked at the challenges facing the united states, our economy and our budget. i remind you that the bowles-simpson commission, a bipartisan commission, came up with a rough target of $4 trillion in savings over a decade. this plan, this budget resolution would achieve, in fact would exceed that target in a way tha
. madam president, a second amendment would require photographic i.d.'s for voting in federal elections. madam president, this is largely provoked by the actions of the obama administration justice department half been fighting states that are trying to institute federal i.d.'s. that is allowed under federal law, and several states are doing that, doing it properly -- texas, south carolina -- but this justice department is trying to shut that down, even though it's allowed by federal law. interesting, that assault on states trying to do their job, trying do things properly, has been made by the head of the civil rights division at justice, thomas perez, who is now nominated for labor secretary. this amendment and this proposal would clarify it by actually requiring photo i.d.'s for voting in federal elections. we require photo i.d.'s for traveling at airports. we require photo i.d.'s for going into a conditions. we require photo i.d.'s for a myriad of things, including visiting the white house. surely, it's a very legitimate, simple requirement that doesn't disenfranchise anyone to make
the next election. and we've got our eye so far off the ball that we now -- every bill that comes to the floor has to have, essentially, a rules committee of one, which is the majority leader deciding whether or not he wants his members to vote on a bill. that doesn't have anything to connect with the history of the senate. this is no longer the greatest deliberative body in the world, because we don't deliberate, we don't have an open-amendment process. we're too afraid of our own shadows to cast a vote and think we might have to defend it. well, if you can't defend any and every vote in this body, you don't have any business being here. and to stifle debate and to limit amendments in the way that this bill has done certainly won't breed any good will going forward. and certainly doesn't do the due service that american citizens are due. mr. president, i'll now take some time to talk about the various amendments that i've called up. amendment 69 was the physical amendment -- was the first amendment i called up. as the ranking member on homeland security and on the committee on pe
in the 2000 election. so what did they decide to do? they just said it would balance. and he said, we're spending only money that we have. we've got a budget that doesn't add to the debt. we've got a budget that begins to pay down the debt. all three of those things were utterly false. the lowest single deficit in his own numbers he submitted to us was $600 billion. that was the least year that he had in his entire 10-year budget of what the deficit would be that year, $600 billion deficit, yet he said we have a budget that pays down the debt, we have a budget that spends only money that we have and a budget that you can be proud of. and that's what we've had here. i hate to say it. our colleagues have produced a budget that utterly fails to alter the debt course we're on. it raise taxes but it doesn't use the taxes to reduce the deficit. it uses the taxes to fund new spending. it really does. i thank the chair. so that's the concern we have today, madam president. and we'll head now into the votes. i think senator murray budget -- i thank senator murray for allowing us to have free a
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15

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